Skip to main content

About your Search

WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
on that point, the companies for stocks like tiffany's, what about aptitude in places like china in. >> overall when we see what's happening in china, so many new brands emerged in china, new companies on the luxury good fronts, and you've had the big conglomerates vogue down their rate and new store openings. watch profitability for luxury companies in 2013. >> okay. r.j., break it down. who do you like for next year? >> in addition to costco and amazon, i like some of the late cycle discretionary plays especially when we see the housing market improve, names like william sonoma and home depot, names that did a great job investing in the supply change, a name like american eagle stands out in that regard. those are probably our top picks heading into 2013. >> jay, what would you avoid? >> anything that's a commoditized retailer. you'll get killed by amazon and other low-cost providers, names like best buy, barnes & noble, any of the office guys. i think most of those names are dead in the water right now and definitely names to avoid at this point. >> dana, any names we missed from you? >> i t
constitution and the history of the rule of law. this interview was part of a discussion on china opposed the legal system hosted by the brookings institution. china's >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the states. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have
with a bunch of allies who supported him. >> i've been reading kissinger's book on china, but he raises's broader question which is important. unfathomable as it is to americans there are parts of the world where they do not believe in alienable rights, right? they don't believe in human rights in the way that we do. >> exactly. and when we try to impose it on them they consider it a violation of their sovereignty. >> exactly. >> china feels that way often. russia, same thing. how far do we go in promoting human rights? the trade off that we'll get here. the law gets passed and human rights violators in russia can't come year and now 1,000 children don't come to the united states and people who want them don't get them. >> my personal view, no. they're glad to take our money and they've long had to put their money overseas, but they do not want human rights promotion and we've seen that inside russia and we've seen that against the crockdown on the internet and this is just the latest interaction of the series of things going back for more than a year against the political opposition an
. the main growth engines are firstly china, which will grow at about 8%. the u.s. is still very important. we are expecting growth of about 2%. if the u.s. goes off of this book with and you have very weak growth, that will be a huge dent in the global outlook and will have transmission of sex to the rest of the global economy at that time when the eurozone is still in recession in japan has also slid into recession. the risk is that this negotiation process could be protracted. i think president obama is proposing the concept of a fallback option, which would at least deliver some of the extension of the tax cuts and also unemployment benefits, which is very important. if the unemployment benefits cease after the first of january, that has an immediate impact on expenditure in the u.s. on about 2 million unemployed people. i think he is going to try to put together a skeleton deal to at least bridge the gap while negotiations continue. u.s. secretary of state -- >> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has been taken to hospital. she suffered a concussion earlier this month. she is bei
their livelihoods when the factory across the street from us closes their doors in november, moving to china, taking around 170 jobs with them. >> the bain capital board has made their decision. the cdo has made his decision. -- ceo has made his decision. we believe the only person in the world who can stop these jobs from the move is mitt romney. >> in the latest sign of global warming, guys in the arctic has shrunk to its smallest area since record-keeping began. >> there are people who rely on the arctic ocean. if the ice melts, it is a scary thought. it is who we are, is where the animals migrate. my elders, the community elders rely on their vitamins, the traditional foods that the ocean supplies. >> i'm sorry, i will stop the subsidy to pbs and other things. i love big bird, i like you, too, but i'm not going to keep on spending money to borrow from china to pay for. >> labor protests against the largest private employer, walmart, is expanded to 28 stores in 12 states. organizers describe the action as the first retail workers' strike in walmart's history. >> i work in the warehouse in illinoi
to year. it is hard to estimate countries like china because they are now pricing things the same way. they have large land forces and they are not deployed across the world. submarines and missiles. china is probably number one on the list. host: this from twitter. guest: that refers to overseas contingency operations. this is a fund that paid for the wars in iraq. it is about $88 billion in that account. there is a pentagon and washington funny math. some people say if the project out, we will save all this money. i wrote a report about saving $1 trillion. most of our troops will be out of afghanistan by 2014. nobody expects it will spend this level of money going out the long term in the future. so the $1 trillion in savings is money we would not have spent anyway. there are some built-in drawdowns in the defense department. were built an about $487 billion over 10 years. they are coming back down. about 100,000 or so and they are built into the system. the pentagon is looking at things that way. host: roger in texas, republican caller. go ahead. caller: i am amazed i got thr
not create any jobs. as far as china is concerned we do not hit that high of a tariff on their imports. i believe it is a lot higher. the whole thing was steve jobs. he treated the apple computer in his garage. when he got successful theme of his company over to china giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he would not even be able to create the apple computer. we just do not do enough for the people of this country. the people who are position to create jobs do not reinvest in the country. i do not think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giant tax breaks given to those who want to invest in the country and create jobs. for a lower than the american businessmen. guest: i understand your frustration. part of it is the corporate tax .ode clearly needs to fix it a lot talk about fixing a and a revenue neutral way. it does not help lowering future deficits any easier. there are some things need to change. in general we need to realize that if we set our country on the bike path making the right investments in -- the right path making investme
? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting better each time out launching missiles and setting off nuclear explosions. >> on that note, how realistic do you think it is? and how soon do you think it would be that they would be able to i'm one of these long-range missiles with a nuclear warhead? >> that is the real question. this last missile test was real important because it showed that they were successful. they got it up into the atmosphere. it can go a long way to the united states. now, if they perfect nuclear explosions and start miniaturizing it, being able to put it on a
with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered but the nightmare begins. so it's heartbreaking. >> did you want to comment? >> we see it as a lost opportunity. there's a lot of lost opportunities in the 20th 20th century, in march 5, 1965, when stall yip dies, the stove yet leaders reach out the united states and talk about endin
in essence would serve as sanctions on iran but the point is that china needs to be pressured to stop the loophole in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from the centrifuge program, and that effort overtime has had tremendous success, and with more and more sanctions it has been more successful. more purchase is stopped, more interdictions and more trouble for iran to make progress on the gas centrifuge program. >> in terms of the nonproliferation program, and david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist particularly in the export controls and the lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation what is your assessment of the u.s. nonproliferation program or what can be done and should be done? >> when you hear the sanctions, those are all the things we try to do. and so, there are four things that can be done to force things to have better training in the region if you will, but we also need to look at the demand side as well. what drives the countries to proliferate and then how do you also built in that notion of a non-proliferation, how do you
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
vacuum cleaner. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby ending the recession by cutting, cutting, -- entering into recession because they are imposing austerity on themselves, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed at a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and are well by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of hours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is came over. but if you are the united states of america and there are certain other factors that i will touch upon later, what you can do is you can expand your defici
about how china is taking over. what we need to make some decisions that is going to help the america people, corporate america, middle-class america, those individuals that are not in the capacity whatever so ever, i expect our elected officials to getting together, work this thing out, do the right thing, quit the fighting and come up with a solution even if they have to go back after the fact and just get things the way they are supposed to be. >> some of the expectations there from willard. we're going to go on to cal on the republicans line in tennessee. what do you think of the fiscal cliff and where the negotiations are so far? >> i think they ought to go over the fiscal cliff. we have people like that that are on the government bill too long. they are sucking the tit of the federal government. i think everyone should pay their fair share. we have almost a $17 billion national debt. not only, the rich but everyone should pay their fair share. we also need some spending cuts too. $3 for every $1. if you don't do this we're going top find ourselfs in a situation -- you want to ta
to -- of china chance is progress to if there was one district name in changing the health and when people said the but the time from cover to,. it was a two session time. what they really meant was that they scanned it things they have read a yesterday. it was the reliable place to go. all of the news fit to print. it was a very important -- it was a very important part of history. let's take the normandy invasion in 1944, a major historic event. you remember -- most of us do not remember that, but if you think of that, could he should the map of the allies' progress? at the end of the thirties. horace. the crimes a point of departure, to make sure they have full reporters, that the most accurate news was really in the newspaper. the great news reporters could do so much. so it really was not the place for people to go to the news. i want to stress something else out. at that time, the government and the media were aligned. there was not this junction that we have now. it was not fox fees. there was not a gap that will come to later. i wanted to become the new media and administration was clos
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)